Sermons and Homilies

On this page, you can learn more about the various medieval manuscripts in St John’s College Library that contain sermons and homilies. The authors include Augustine, Bernard of Clairvaux, and Gregory the Great.

Oxford, St John’s College, MS 19, fol. 17r

MS 19

MS 19 contains Augustine’s Sermons on Psalms 80–118. Augustine of Hippo, also known as Saint Augustine, was a bishop, theologian, and philosopher (d.430). This manuscript was produced in England at the turn of the fourteenth century.

A full catalogue entry is available here.

Oxford, St John’s College, MS 62, fol. 1r

MS 62

MS 62 was produced in England at the turn of the thirteenth century and it contains a copy of Bernard of Clairvaux’s Sermons on the Song of Songs. The key themes of the Old Testament Song of Songs include love and longing. In his sermons, Bernard of Clairvaux (d.1153) interprets the Song of Songs allegorically.

A full catalogue entry is available here.

Oxford, St John’s College, MS 65, fol. 1r

MS 65

MS 65 contains a copy of the ‘sermon-diary’ of Richard Fitzralph, Archbishop of Armagh (d.1360). This manuscript was produced in England at the end of the fourteenth century. It was likely once owned by Henry Savile of Bank (d.1617), a prolific collector of medieval manuscripts.

A full catalogue entry is available here.

Oxford, St John’s College, MS 121, fol. 97v

MS 121

MS 121, which was produced in England at the beginning of the fifteenth century, contains a copy of Gregory the Great’s Homilies on the Gospels. Pope Gregory I (d. 604), commonly known as Saint Gregory the Great, is most famous for instigating the Gregorian Mission to convert England to Christianity.

A full catalogue entry is available here.

Oxford, St John’s College, MS 141, fol. 1r

MS 141

MS 141 principally contains a copy of Gregory the Great’s Homelia in evangelia. Pope Gregory I (d. 604), commonly known as Saint Gregory the Great, is most famous for instigating the Gregorian Mission to convert England to Christianity. MS 141 was produced in England in the fifteenth century.

A full catalogue entry is available here.

%d bloggers like this: